Questions to ask yourself before you cast your ballot

There’s a level of anxiety being expressed on social media right now that is far from healthy and giving birth to an ugly sectarianism.  And for the Christian, that kind of anxiety and sectarianism is both damaging to an individual’s walk of faith as well as harmful to the unity of the Church.  Yet turning a blind eye to matters political and neglecting our privilege of voting is being a poor steward of the kingdom we are to be seeking above all things (Matt 6.33).  So in this soup of sound bites, polarizing talking heads, nasty barbs and zingers, suspicious conspStei101028iracy theories, red-faced cries of injustice, and enough analytical info to cause the most patient among us to throw up their hands in disgust, here are a few questions that we all can ask ourselves to help bring focus to our faithfulness at the polls.

  1. Who possesses my greatest motivational allegiance?  Our loyalties call us to be motivated to all sorts of things.  As a Washington Redskins fan, I’m motivated to support them through thick and thin.  However, if Kirk Cousins, the surprise QB star of the Redskins’ most recent season came out in favor of voting for Attila the Hun for POTUS, I’d probably have to respectfully decline to follow suit regardless of how cool Cousins’ first name is.  This comes into political play when the party we most often align with puts forward a nominee that requires a Christian to check his or her allegiance to Christ at the door before casting their vote.  Are you being asked to violate your conscience in voting for someone of questionable character and/or competencies in order to “support the party?”  If so, ask yourself, “Why do I feel an allegiance to this particular political party?  Would I ever ask a politician to violate his or her conscience in order to support some agenda that I have?”  There is a cost of discipleship when one claims allegiance to Jesus Christ.  Sometimes that cost entails relegating one’s vote to what the world might consider irrelevant.
  2. Should I submit my conscience to the ‘lesser of two evils’ argument?  Or another way of asking the question is this: how despicable does a nominee for my party of choice have to be before I refuse to support them?  I mentioned Attila the Hun earlier only partially in jest because the choices for nominees Americans are being offered have been increasingly distasteful over recent years.  But I want to point out the ethic that is often behind the motivation to vote for one ‘evil’ over another one.  Most people think, “I have to vote for Candidate Gag.  I don’t like it one bit, but Candidate Blech has to be stopped.”  Or another way of describing this ethic is this way: the ends justify the means.  But not only is this a sub-Christian ethic, it is the ethic that gave this world such atrocities as Hitler’s “Final Solution” and Mao’s “Great Leap Forward.”
  3. Is my choice of candidate driven more by fear of the future or by the fear of the LORD?  So much fear-mongering goes on on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and other social media avenues that the Christian must be careful to guard their heart.  And part of that guarding process is reminding oneself that no Christ-follower ought to fear whoever occupies the oval office.  Though our nation’s Commander in Chief wields more authority now than ever was intended by our nation’s founders, it doesn’t alter the fact that “The king’s heart is a stream of water in the hand of the Lordhe turns it wherever he will (Prov. 21.1).”  Do not fear the state.  Fear God.  Or as Psalm 143 puts it: “Put not your trust in princes, in a son of man, in whom there is no salvation… Blessed is he whose help is the God of Jacob, whose hope is in the Lord his God, who made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them, who keeps faith forever (Psalm 146.3, 5-6).”
  4. Am I familiar with what God’s Word says about what makes a good leader?  I considered not putting this point in this post but I keep hearing my bride’s voice tell me things like, “Go ahead and believe the best about what other people know but state your point anyway.”  To that end, part of fearing God is a working knowledge of what His Word has to say about who is qualified to lead and who isn’t, who is a fool and who is wise, who is a righteous person and who is wicked.  I am fully aware that we are not electing a PastorOTUS, but the Bible nevertheless gives us a glut of data by which we can judge who is fit to be a public official and who is not.  Consider just a few verses from just 10 chapters of Proverbs that apply to at least one of the top three major party candidates: 10.4; 10.9-12; 10.18-19; 11.2; 11.9; 11.12; 12.15-18; 13.10; 13.16; 14.2; 14.5; 15.1-2; 21.4; 21.23-24; 21.29; 22.5; 22.10-11; 25.14; 25.19; 26.1; 26.12.  Take these earthy proverbs alongside other biblical data about what kings aren’t supposed to do (Deut. 17.14-17) and what kind of person an overseer in the Church is supposed to be (1 Tim 3.1-7; Titus 1.7-9) and a much clearer picture emerges about what a public, elected servant ought to look like. [Note: Harry Reeder in a recent blog post put an important qualification: “[I]t must be remembered that at times, God’s common grace produces leaders that though unsaved have a dependable and reliable character.”]

Can we not look at the major party candidates as well as independents and minor party candidates, vote for the best person available with a clear conscience, and trust that we are cared for by the mighty hand of the King on His heavenly throne?  Can we not trust a long-range view in which there is major reform in the existing major parties or their break-up and subsequent shift in the political centers of gravity?  So yes.  We have a right to be upset with both the Democratic and Republican parties.  But no.  We should not allow our anger to cause us to respond faithlessly at the polls.  We must consider how the reactions in our own hearts can lead us down unwise paths.  We must weigh our decisions and actions according to the clear teachings of scripture, for “By wisdom a house is built, and by understanding it is established (Prov. 24.3).”

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under Culture and Economics, Ethics and Aesthetics

One response to “Questions to ask yourself before you cast your ballot

  1. anna mcKinzie

    Kirk – Well written, insightful and very entertaining. I concur wholeheartedly. thank you for your words.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s